CaseyDiskin

Casey Diskin- ARTS program

ORC  has purchased 12 acres of land adjacent to its current location at 7030 Whitmore Lake Road in Brighton for an expansion.

“More and more children are being diagnosed with autism,” said Peterson, founder and CEO of ORC.We feel the needs of children with autism in our community are great and this expansion is designed to fulfill that need beyond any parent’s expectation. 

The uncertainty surrounding school in the fall has also increased demand for autism services. Many parents of children with autism are looking for an alternative to homeschooling. Oxford Recovery Center recently started a program called Camp ABA. The program currently offers traditional Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapy and services in a fun, camp-like setting. As the school year approaches, a special education teacher will be conducting classes. This experience will differ from traditional school settings in that the behavioral technicians for each child will be close by to intervene if their child needs attention. 

Many parents of children with autism don’t realize they have a choice when it comes to their child’s education,” said Casey Diskin, director of the ARTS (Autism Recovery Through Synergy) program, which combines traditional ABA with other therapies the center is known for, like hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), physical therapy, speech therapy, and occupational therapy.

By combining therapies and delivering a synergistic treatment plan, we are able to deliver outstanding results which improve the quality of life of our kiddos and their families,” Diskin said. “Camp ABA fits our synergistic approach to helping children with autism. It provides classroom learning to meet educational needs and combines it with ABA to provide behavioral learning.” 

ORC was founded by Peterson after discovering the healing effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for her daughter, who was stricken with viral encephalitisWithin 48 hours, her daughter, a happy, functioning 9-year-old girl, declined to the functioning level of an 11-month-old. After a great deal of research and a lot of convincing doctors to provide hyperbaric oxygen therapy, Peterson secured treatment for her daughter. 

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy gave me my daughter back,” Peterson said. 

“She started treatment unable to walk or talk, but after several months of treatment, she danced the ‘Nutcracker’ as if nothing had happened to her. It became my mission to make sure no other mother went through the same ordeal or felt the same hopelessness of not being able to take care of their child,” Peterson said.

HBOT has always been the primary focus of ORC but Peterson, a former special education teacher and administrator, noticed the results the therapy provided for children with autism.

It was a dream come true,” Peterson said. “I have always had a special place in my heart for children with autism and we finally had a program to truly help them.”   

The success of the ARTS program created the need for expansion. 

Our vision is to expand our facility to not only be able to serve more children, but to also create a community where they can learn how to function successfully in different environments throughout our community,” Peterson said. 

Groundbreaking ceremony at the new building site- Casey Diskin

OXFORD RECOVERY CENTER BREAKS GROUND ON STATE-OF-THE-ART AUTISM CENTER
Oxford Recovery Center (ORC) provides world-renowned autism services at centers in Troy and Brighton. Due to the growing need for autism services in the Brighton, Michigan community, Oxford Recovery Center is breaking ground on a 35,000 square foot expansion of their main campus located at the corner of Whitmore Lake Road and Malby Road.
A groundbreaking ceremony to kick off the project will be held at the new building site directly south of the existing facility on May 17th at 10:00. The public is invited to attend. Brivar Construction will be handling the construction of this major investment in the Brighton community.
ORC moved into the current 32,000 square foot building in 2018. “When we moved to the Brighton campus, we felt we would never fill up the building,” says Dr. Tami Peterson, Founder and CEO at Oxford Recovery Center. In just two years, the demand for services has increased dramatically.
Casey Diskin, Executive Director of Autism Services, credits the synergistic approach to treating autism as the main factor in the center’s amazing growth. “Autism diagnoses are on the rise, but more and more parents of children see the benefits of our approach to treatment,” says Diskin. “We believe autism is a medical condition and treat it as such.” Oxford offers more than traditional Applied Behavior Analysis services. “We offer treatments and therapies designed to help our autism patients reach their potential,” explains Diskin. “We have seen amazing results combining hyperbaric oxygen therapy, neurofeedback, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy.” The center does not stop there. A comprehensive testing and medical consultation program helps to isolate medical problems and provides a means to solve them.
This is nothing new for Oxford Recovery Center. It has been providing these services to patients to treat more than 100 medical conditions since 2008. “Our goal is to help our patients get their lives back after an illness or injury. “No matter what your condition, we probably treat it,” says Peterson. “We have successfully treated everything from autism and stroke to macular degeneration and Lyme disease.”
As part of the expansion is a remodeling of the current facility. “All of our services other than autism will be housed in the current facility,” says Gary Marken, Chief Operations Officer at Oxford Recovery Center. “We have already converted 6,500 Square feet of unused space into areas for Speech and Occupational Therapies and a large multi-purpose room for the autism program.” Part of the plan is to expand the company’s hyperbaric oxygen therapy program. “Currently, we operate five hyperbaric oxygen chambers,” continues Marken. “We will be expanding our footprint to include three Chambers.”
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the cornerstone of Oxford Recovery Centers success. Using a medical-grade, hard chamber, Oxford is able to deliver 100% oxygen under pressure. Our bodies use oxygen to heal and regenerate themselves, and nothing provides the body with more healing oxygen than HBOT. The treatment is powerful because it floods the body with so much oxygen causing it to concentrate in plasma. This allows the oxygen to reach areas red blood cells cannot and it penetrates deeper into damaged tissues. “Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has many medical benefits including destroying harmful bacteria, encouraging blood vessel growth, fighting viruses, and healing wounds to name a few,” says Peterson “Perhaps the biggest benefit and why it is so effective in treating so many conditions is its ability to reduce inflammation. The concentrated levels of oxygen stimulate intracellular signaling proteins, which upregulate genetic expression of anti-inflammatory molecules.”

Casey Diskin’s New Role at ORC

Casey Diskin has dedicated over twelve years to helping individuals with autism. Her passion is to ensure they lead healthy, productive lives. While completing her education at Macquarie University, Sydney, Casey Diskin worked at the Learning Center in Sydney, Australia.

Casey Diskin earned her Master’s Degree in psychology. She has worked with a many children with autism and developmental disabilities in numerous capacities for several years. Casey Diskin has experience in verbal behavior programming, skill acquisition, precision teaching, direct instruction and behavior reduction. Casey Diskin spent her first 5 years in practice in Australia before moving back to the US.

In 2018, Casey Diskin joined ORC as their Director of ABA. In 2019 she began her new role as Executive Director of Autism Services. Diskin oversees all Occupational therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech and ABA. Today, ORC has 3 locations throughout the United States and employs nearly 100 highly-skilled employees, and is a leading employer of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs).

Casey Diskin runs support group for parents of children with autism

For more than a decade, Casey Diskin has intimately studied autism and the effects it has on children, parents, and their family and friends. Today, in addition to actively working with children with disabilities each day, Diskin runs two support groups for parents of children with autism in Brighton and Troy, Michigan./strong/em” data-reactid=”11″>For more than a decade, Casey Diskin has intimately studied autism and the effects it has on children, parents, and their family and friends. Today, in addition to actively working with children with disabilities each day, Diskin runs two support groups for parents of children with autism in Brighton and Troy, Michigan.

<p class=”canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm” type=”text” content=”strongHUNTINGTON WOODS, MI / ACCESSWIRE / December 13, 2019 / /stronga href=https://pr.report/alRWKsqS rel=nofollow noopener target=_blankCasey Diskin/a attended Wayne State University where she worked on her degree focusing on helping children who suffer from various disabilities. While there, she discovered a passion for children afflicted with autism and the struggles their families’ face. She continued her education at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia where she enrolled in a unique program focusing on functional life skills through naturalistic teaching.” data-reactid=”12″>HUNTINGTON WOODS, MI / ACCESSWIRE / December 13, 2019 / Casey Diskin attended Wayne State University where she worked on her degree focusing on helping children who suffer from various disabilities. While there, she discovered a passion for children afflicted with autism and the struggles their families’ face. She continued her education at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia where she enrolled in a unique program focusingon functional life skills through naturalistic teaching.

<p class=”canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm” type=”text” content=”Ever since coming back to America in 2013 to apply her degrees in the field, a href=https://pr.report/06tJwLMo rel=nofollow noopener target=_blankCasey Diskin/a has served integral roles at facilities focusing on alleviating and resolving autism through modern means.” data-reactid=”13″>Ever since coming back to America in 2013 to apply her degrees in the field, Casey Diskin has served integral roles at facilities focusingon alleviating and resolving autism through modern means.

<p class=”canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm” type=”text” content=”Research has shown that parents of children with autism experience much more stress than parents of neurotypical children. That stress is felt on the entire family unit and in their marriage. Studies show that the divorce rate for parents of children with Autism is over 70%.” data-reactid=”14″>Research has shown that parents of children with autism experience much more stress than parents of neurotypical children. That stress is felt on the entire family unit and in their marriage. Studies show that the divorce rate for parents of children with Autism is over 70%.

Similar studies tell us that these parents must perform all daily functions while typically getting less quality sleep at night, mainly because their children do not sleep as well. Parents of children with severe autism will often have to perform this routine for decades and self-manage a life-long stress. However, professionals like  Casey Diskin provide opportunities to relieve their stress and build communities that gather people who understand and face similar or identical challenges as they do.” Similar studies tell us that these parents must perform all daily functions while typically getting less quality sleep at night, mainly because their children do not sleep as well. Parents of children with severe autism will often have to perform this routine for decades and self-manage a life-long stress. However, professionals like Casey Diskin provide opportunities to relieve their stress and build communities that gather people who understand and face similar or identical challenges as they do.

“In these groups, Diskin is able to lead the parents towards mindfulness and positive adult development that helps them achieve peace in their day-to-day. They may learn relaxation techniques or participate in enlightening discussions. Beyond helping them cope, the groups also help them learn how to access resources in the community and become more optimistic about their individual situations–accepting present conditions and looking towards future growth. As a result, parents leave feeling more gratitude and contentment that carries over into their daily lives.” In these groups, Diskin is able to lead the parents towards mindfulness and positive adult development that helps them achieve peace in their day-to-day. They may learn relaxation techniques or participate in enlightening discussions. Beyond helping them cope, the groups also help them learn how to access resources in the community and become more optimistic about their individual situations–accepting present conditions and looking towards future growth. As a result, parentsleave feeling more gratitude and contentment that carries over into their daily lives.

Parents of children with autism face a unique challenge that is often underrepresented and underappreciated by many in the medical field, says a Parents of children with autism face a unique challenge that is often underrepresented and underappreciated by many in the medical field,” says Casey Diskin. “Support groups like ours boost their morale and show them first-hand that they’re not in this fight alone.”

Meet Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin began working with children with disabilities while pursuing  an undergraduate degree at Wayne State University. From there, her passion for working with children on the autism spectrum grew. She  created and implemented treatment plans for children and young adults at the Friendship Circle in West Bloomfield Michigan, and started her own company, Compass Michigan, to advocate for children in public schools.

Now she is leading our autism program and working to implement our synergistic approach to make a difference in each child that comes to us.

At Oxford Recovery Center,  Casey Diskin runs our unique ABA program that  focuses on teaching skills that improve the quality of a child’s life. With our naturalistic teaching approach, children get both one-on-one attention with our outstanding Behavioral Technicians and gather for group activities such as gym, creative arts, music, and play. The children benefit from constant individual attention (and get assistance, as needed) while also learning how to play with peers and follow instructions in a group setting.

Casey loves live music, good food, and good company. She is married to Joshua and is the mother to Asa and Evy. (She’d love to show you a few photos of her adorable son and baby girl.)

Casey Diskin Encourages Novel Therapies for Autism

Casey Diskin serves as a director at a Michigan-based recovery center where big things are happening to improve the lives of children with disabilities.  Diskin has developed a unique approach to care that is gaining increased attention in the medical field as she helps not only the children, but their whole families. Diskin currently oversees an autism recovery program where she uses HBOT (hyperbaric oxygen therapy) combined with speech and occupational therapy, and applied behavior analysis to treat her patients. Her results have been very impressive and considered a huge success.

“Once patients with neurological conditions began seeing the great results Casey Diskin could accomplish through hyperbaric oxygen therapy, parents with children on the autism spectrum began asking her to perform the same therapy for their kids.”

Diskin claims that she hears stories constantly of happier parents and children as a result of treatment. To name a few of the successes, parents are reporting that their children have built new friendships and are also preforming better in school. “Medically, there is evidence that individuals with autism have inflammation in the brain,” says Casey Diskin. “HBOT medically addresses the issue by reducing the inflammation. Our novel program is a multi-therapy approach to treating autism. We believe in creating a synergistic approach that allows us to treat the medical issues of our clients while simultaneously teaching functional socially significant life skills.”

“Our unique approach to autism has been a huge success with families across the state,” says Casey Diskin. “We hear stories all the time of happier parents, children who have developed

new friendships, siblings playing together more, children performing better in school, and more successfully integrating into their communities.”

“When I started, I wasn’t even sure I knew what hyperbaric oxygen therapy was. Now I see it and how it works to help children with autism,” says Casey Diskin. “Our team is pretty amazing.

While recovery looks different for every client, it does mean that everyone is improving in their individual skills, health, and quality of life. This is what our synergy program does for its clients

and their families. I want us to do even more for a bigger population. We see so many older kids and young adults come to us. They need our services too,” she concluded.

Casey Diskin

Behavior Therapist Casey Diskin Pioneers Program that Promotes a Synergistic Approach to Care for Children with Autism

An experienced behavior therapist, Casey Diskin has spent years developing a multifaceted approach to care for children with disabilities. Diskin looks to resources such as applied behavior analysis, speech therapy, occupational therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy to help children with autism attain personal growth and learn new skills faster. 

 

Casey Diskin has dedicated the bulk of her professional career to researching and discovering novel therapies and solutions for children with disabilities, especially those suffering from autism. She’s gained a lot of recognition in recent years for her clients’ breakthroughs after receiving a combination of behavior therapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy under her guidance. 

 

Diskin attributes her approach to the program she attended at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia that focused on functional life skills through naturalistic teaching. Throughout her education and career, she has held a firm belief that autism is recoverable, mainly due to the fact that it’s diagnosed on a set of deficits such as social and emotional functionality that she believes can be improved through specialized therapies. The focus of her unique approach is to increase those deficits until they no longer meet the criteria for an autism diagnosis.

 

In addition to behavior therapy, speech therapy, and occupational therapy, Casey Diskin has begun recommending hyperbaric oxygen therapy to increase the deficits mentioned above. This unique therapy utilizes increased pressure (usually up to three times higher than normal) in conjunction with high concentrations of oxygen to heal the body. Breathing in high levels of oxygen can have a number of positive effects including treating decompression sickness, improving healing for serious infections, ridding air bubbles from blood vessels, and repairing wounds at a faster rate. 

 

Casey Diskin tells us that in order for the body to heal tissues, it requires a steady supply of oxygen delivered through the bloodstream. In hyperbaric oxygen therapy, oxygen levels are increased to help carry more healing agents to an injury site, expediting wound healing for patients around the world. 

 

Through her work, Diskin has demonstrated how hyperbaric oxygen therapy can also alleviate an issue at the core of any autism diagnosis: by reducing inflammation in the brain, she explains that the therapy helps children suffering from autism learn new skills faster and reach new levels of personal growth. While the therapy is mainly used today to expedite healing for a range of physical conditions and injuries, using it to treat brain injuries and disabilities like autism is still a relatively new practice.

 

“Our novel program is a multi-therapy approach to treating autism,” says Casey Diskin. “We believe in creating a synergistic approach that allows us to treat the medical issues of our clients while simultaneously teaching functional, socially significant life skills. Medically, there is evidence that individuals with autism have inflammation in the brain, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy addresses the issue.”

Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin Earns Spot on 36 Under 36 for Contributions to her Community

Jewish News and The Well have partnered on an annual list of professional Jewish people under the age of 36 who make landmark contributions to their communities and to the world. Casey Diskin was recently named on the list of 36 under 36 for her work with children with disabilities and her dedication to improving the lives of families in her community.

 Casey Diskin has made a tremendous impact in her community by helping children with disabilities, especially those with autism, overcome everyday obstacles through a variety of therapy approaches. She also coaches their parents and families so they are better prepared to face the day and help their child find personal growth and development. For her contributions, she has earned many distinguished titles and gained much recognition. Recently, she was named on a list of Jewish professionals under the age of 36 who are recognized for their impactful work in their communities.

The Detroit Jewish News partners with The Well every year to highlight 36 young professionals

who have demonstrated their worth to both Jewish and general communities around the country. Last year, they named Casey Diskin as one of the top young Jewish professionals for her work with children with disabilities and the novel approaches to care she’s developed. Those who appear on the 36 under 36 are described by its publisher as go-getters, doers, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, activists, and community organizers who are featured in the year’s publication.

The Well, which is half of the governing body overseeing the professional list, is an inclusive Jewish community-building and spirituality-outreach initiative geared to the needs of millennials and the unaffiliated or under-affiliated in the Metro Detroit area. Representatives at The Well believe that Jewish ethics, values and spirituality can and should be directly applicable to our lives as part of a radically inclusive Jewish community. It is their hope that these elements should drive us to positively impact both intimate communities and the world at large.

The Well was founded in 2015 and the 36 Under 36 was created only a couple of years later. Both are projects of the Lori Talsky Zekelman Fund at Temple Israel. It is the hope of their leaders that by highlighting young professionals like Casey Diskin, they can inspire more people to get involved in community-centric Jewish living in Metro Detroit. They accomplish these goals through relationship building, network weaving and participant-driven programming among other outreaches.

Casey Diskin has helped uncover new solutions for children with autism and other developmental disorders since she completed her undergraduate program at Wayne State

University and earned her master’s from Macquarie University. Today, she provides support to families with children who have challenging behaviors, advocates for children in schools, helps families secure insurance coverage for therapeutic services, and contracts and negotiates rates with insurance companies among other exceptional tasks that directly improve her community.

Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin Helps Parents of Children with Autism Cope and Find Lasting Peace

For more than a decade, Casey Diskin has intimately studied autism and the effects it has on children, parents, and their family and friends. Today, in addition to actively working with children with disabilities each day, Diskin runs two support groups for parents of children with autism in Brighton and Troy, Michigan.

 Casey Diskin attended Wayne State University where she worked on her degree focusing on helping children who suffer from various disabilities. While there, she discovered a passion for children afflicted with autism and the struggles their families’ face. She continued her education at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia where she enrolled in a unique program focusing on functional life skills through naturalistic teaching.

Ever since coming back to America in 2013 to apply her degrees in the field, Casey Diskin has served integral roles at facilities focusing on alleviating and resolving autism through modern means.

Research has shown that parents of children with autism experience much more stress than parents of neurotypical children. That stress is felt on the entire family unit and in their marriage. Studies show that the divorce rate for parents of children with Autism is over 70%.

Similar studies tell us that these parents must perform all daily functions while typically getting less quality sleep at night, mainly because their children do not sleep as well. Parents of children with severe autism will often have to perform this routine for decades and self-manage a life-long stress. However, professionals like Casey Diskin provide opportunities to relieve their stress and build communities that gather people who understand and face similar or identical challenges as they do.

In these groups, Diskin is able to lead the parents towards mindfulness and positive adult development that helps them achieve peace in their day-to-day. They may learn relaxation techniques or participate in enlightening discussions. Beyond helping them cope, the groups also help them learn how to access resources in the community and become more optimistic about their individual situations–accepting present conditions and looking towards future growth. As a result, parents leave feeling more gratitude and contentment that carries over into their daily lives.

“Parents of children with autism face a unique challenge that is often underrepresented and underappreciated by many in the medical field,” says Casey Diskin. “Support groups like ours boost their morale and show them first-hand that they’re not in this fight alone.”

Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin Was Named one of “Jewish News” and “The Well’s” 36 Under 36

Casey Diskin has spent her entire career working with kids with disabilities and has made a significant impact on the lives of children and families across the country. To honor her contributions, she was named one of “Jewish News” and “the Well’s” 36 Under 36, a title given to exceptional Jewish contributors under the age of 36. 

 

Each year, The Detroit Jewish News partners with The Well to highlight 36 young professionals who have had a tremendous impact on both Jewish and general communities. Last year, they named Casey Diskin to the list for her work in the community and especially her work with kids with disabilities. The people who appear on the list are described as go-getters, doers, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, activists, and community organizers who are nominated through the program each year. 

 

The 36 Under 36 is a project organized by The Well, which is an inclusive Jewish community building, education and spirituality outreach initiative geared to the needs of millennials and the unaffiliated or under-affiliated in the Metro Detroit area. The belief of The Well is that Jewish ethics, values and spirituality can and should be directly applicable to our lives as part of a radically inclusive Jewish community. In addition, they believe these elements should drive us to positively impact both intimate communities and the world at large.

 

They achieve this vision by supporting young professionals like Casey Diskin and increasing the number of people actively participating in community-centric Jewish living in Metro Detroit. The Well accomplishes this by means of relationship building, network weaving and participant-driven programming. As a whole, The Well is a project of the Lori Talsky Zekelman Fund at Temple Israel.

 

Through their 36 under 36 listing, the group is able to highlight the achievements of young Jewish professionals and spread the positive work they do in communities across Chicago and the surrounding area. At the same time, the list inspires others to get involved in their communities, both general and Jewish. The Well was founded in 2015 and the 36 Under 36 was created just a couple of years later. 

 

Casey Diskin has worked with children with autism and other developmental disorders since earning her degree in 2004. She completed her undergraduate program at Wayne State University and earned a master’s degree from Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia before completing an internship through Melbourne University that provided real-world experience to support her education. 

 

Today, Casey Diskin collaborates with  Behavior analysts (BCBAs), Speech therapists and occupational therapists to provide support to families with children that present challenging behaviors.